The death-bed of a day, how beautiful!Philip James Bailey, Festus ( A Library and Balcony)

sunset

There is no sun that rose before a sunset.

Ndebele Tribe Proverb, Zimbabwe

foto – SUNSET AT LINDEN LEA BILAMBIL 2008

Yes. Feet on earth. Knock on wood. Touch stone. Good luck to all. Desert Solitaire. EDWARD ABBEY.

40 32 el alamein 1942

But stark within my memory
I see it once again
When we all looked at it anxiously
Days when we hoped for rain;
I hear the hollow sounds it made,
Like some prophetic drum,
As I tapped rung on rung, afraid
Of dreadful days to come,

 

Our Corrugated Iron Tank by James Hackston

FOTO  – 2/3 PIONEER IN WESTERN DESERT WWII

No city should be too large for a man to walk out of in a morning. Cyril Connolly.

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I can remember walking as a child. It was not customary to say you were fatigued. It was customary to complete the goal of the expedition.
Katherine Hepburn

FOTO – MORRIS STREET PADDINGTON BRISBANE 2007

First law on holes – when you’re in one, stop digging! Denis Healey.

 

mattock_19545_md

 

The Miser.

A miser sold all that he had and bought a lump of gold, which he buried in a hole in the ground by the side of an old wall and went to look at daily. One of his workmen observed his frequent visits to the spot and decided to watch his movements. He soon discovered the secret of the hidden treasure, and digging down, came to the lump of gold, and stole it. The Miser, on his next visit, found the hole empty and began to tear his hair and to make loud lamentations. A neighbour, seeing him overcome with grief and learning the cause, said, Pray do not grieve so; but go and take a stone, and place it in the hole, and fancy that the gold is still lying there. It will do you quite the same service; for when the gold was there, you had it not, as you did not make the slightest use of it. Aesop

http://www.essaysadepts.com/

“We’ve heard that beyond the next mountain where men have never gone before there is an even yet wider valley and more abundant water."

AUSSIE DAY EVE 019

MTC CRONIN

SEVEN MYSTERIOUS SONGS VI
AUTHORSHIP

Mountains, valleys, rivers merge
The land hides itself
in landscape
The day’s form buried in my eye
like a grandmother in her coffin

FOTO – BILAMBIL VALLEY 2009

Think of friends like great trees, leafy limbs that come around us and spread over us and bring shade from the sun, and from the blast of adversity, and from winter’s wind of loneliness – a great sheltering tree. That is a friend. DR ROGER BARRIER.

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“Like the trees, we are visitors, guests of earth. The light shines down, and a bud breaks, branches give way before us, a book’s leaves open, and our eyes look, look again. We are a grove, companions spared to be on earth at the same time. The trees – though not our kind – are kin, elder relatives standing to greet us.”
Kim Stafford, from “Tree of All Trees” in Entering the Grove.

http://www.dancingwithtrees.com/quotations.htm

FOTO – BELL LAND AT CONDONG NSW 2008

All worn and wasted by the storms, All gapped and fractured by the storms, All split and splintered by the storms. HENRY KENDALL.

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Roads are wet where’er one wendeth,
And with rain the thistle bendeth,
And the brook cries like a child!
Not a rainbow shines to cheer us;
Ah! the sun comes never near us,
And the heavens look dark and wile.

Mary Howitt, The Wet Summer, from the German

FOTO – KALANG 2008

We come spinning out of nothingness, scattering stars like dust. JALAL AD-DIN RUMI.

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Hard heads in Hardeston, 
Quakers in the Pow ; 
The braw lasses d Abdie 
Canna spin their ain tow" 

 

A CENTURY OF  SCOTTISH PROVERBS AND SAYINGS,

IN PROSE AND RHYME, CURRENT IN FIFE AND CHIEFLY OF 
FIFE ORIGIN. 

COLLECTED AND SELECTED BY G: MACKAY, 

Sheriff of the Counties of Fife and Kinross. 
FOTO - MT TAMBORINE SPINNER 2008

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. Harriet Van Horne.

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“I’ll bet what motivated the British to colonize so much of the world is that they were just looking for a decent meal.”
Martha Harrison

 

FOTO – ONE OF MICHAEL’S CURRIES AT JAMIESON’S RESTAURANT TWEED HEADS WEST 2007.

old rural English proverb: "Hall binks are oft sliddery" roughly translated, "The benches in manorial halls are often slippery"

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Chip the glasses and crack the plates!
Blunt the knives and bend the forks!
That’s what Bilbo hates –
Smash the bottles and burn the corks!
Cut the cloth and tread on the fat!
Pour the milk on the pantry floor!
Leave the bones on the bedroom mat!
Splash the wine on every door!
Dump the crocks in a boiling bowl;
Pound them up with a thumping pole;
And when you’ve finished, if any are whole,
Send them down the hall to roll!
That’s what Bilbo Baggins hates!
So, carefully! carefully! with the plates!

 

THE HOBBIT. JRR TOLKIEN.

FOTO – STOKERS SIDING HALL 2009

“The pebble in the brook secretly thinks itself a precious stone” Japanese Proverb.

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Adiye nje oka, o mu omi, o gbe okuta pe pe pe mi, sibe sibe o ni ohun o ni eyin, to o ba ni eyin, se o ma je irin ni? (Yoruba and Idanre)
A chicken eats corn, drinks water and swallows little pebbles, but still complains of having no teeth. If she had teeth would she eat steel? (Literal English)

Yoruba and Idanre ( Nigeria ) Proverb

FOTO -LAKE MACQUARIE AT SUNSHINE 2008

When I dare to be powerful, to use my strength in the service of my vision, then it becomes less and less important whether I am afraid. Audre Lorde

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Thank God I have the seeing eye, that is to say, as I lie in bed I can walk step by step on the fells and rough land seeing every stone and flower and patch of bog and cotton pass where my old legs will never take me again.  Beatrix Potter.

FOTO – FROM BILAMBIL NEAR TERRANORA RESORT LOOKING SOUTH